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SHARED PAST, COMMON FUTURE


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SHARED PAST, COMMON FUTURE


 A WAY OF LIFE LONG LOST

You won't find the name "Bovina Valley" on any modern map, but it lives on through the traditions we follow and the passion we have for our community.

What remains of Bovina Valley is its pure habitat, resilient values and strong individuals who are working to keep alive a way of life long lost. A way of life that passed from legend into myth and is new reemerging.

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A COMMUNITY JOINED BY HISTORY & HERITAGE

SHARED VALUES & PASSION FOR FAMILY TRADITIONS

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A COLLECTIVE OF MODERN LOCAL ENTREPRENEURS

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Then & Now


The Story of Bovina Valley

Then & Now


The Story of Bovina Valley

Our heritage gives us purpose, pride and reason to believe what we do is good for the many, not the few. 

Dairy farming begins in the Catskils

The first family dairy farms struggled to make farming work in the Catskill Mountains. They began to farm with the terrain and weather, ultimately creating a sustainable way of life in the mountains.

1817

Dairy farming thrives in the Catskills

With time, hundreds of small-scale dairy farms began to thrive in the Catskills. They passed on these family farms for generations, as they did with their traditions. Most families even had a signature call for their cows.

1863

Communities built around dairy farming

Dairy farming became the main industry of this region. Communities were built around dairy farming. The dairy life wasn't easy, however. The regional community and marketplace understood this and embraced it, understanding the value.

1875



Bovina Butter Served at the White House

Famed for its high quality, Bovina butter reached the White House and was regularly shipped by the tubful to New York City's better grocers as late as 1939.

Award-winning Butter: Chicago's World Fair

Local milkmaid Martha Danforth's original sweet cream butter wins the Chicago World's Fair Award of Excellence that still hangs in the farmhouse kitchen. Martha's great-great-great-granddaughter Gail and her daughter Shannon eventually create Cowbella.

1893-1897

The Great Extinction

New machinery, chemicals and methodology from the Industrial Revolution lead to the creation of large, industrial farming. The "Get Big or Get Out" mentality will eventually shrink the number of family farms in the Catskills Watershed region from 1176 to 127 by 2016.

1950

Staying small in a big, new world

These remaining small family farms continued to adapt to the modern world, without compromising their values. Many have worked hard to adapt to the changing marketplace while keeping their farmland in agriculture in honor of past generations and for the next.

2006

A Natural Coming Together

These remaining small family farms come together in a natural way. Sharing a unique heritage and a common set of values, Bovina Valley has emerged as a promise to our local community and friends from beyond. A promise to always create experiences and products made with the same sincerity as those first dairy farmers.

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